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The purpose of this blog is to have a little fun. It is NOT to start arguments. I don't profess to be an expert on Sci-fi, nor do I aspire to become an expert. You are welcome to comment on any and all content you find here. If my opinion differs from yours, as far as I am concerned, it's all okay. I will never say that you are wrong because you disagree with me, and I expect the same from those that comment here. Also, my audience on the blog will include some young people. Please govern your language when posting comments.

Posts will hopefully be regular based on the movies I see, the television shows I watch, and the books I read as well as what ever strikes me as noteworthy.


***SPOILER ALERT***
Spoilers will appear here and are welcome.

Saturday, September 21, 2013

The Beginning of the Fall - David R. George III's Star Trek: The Fall: Revelation and Dust



Star Trek: The Fall: Revelation and Dust by David R. George III


A few weeks ago, I learned about ST: The Fall series of novels thanks to a Facebook post by Dayton Ward.  I immediately went to Amazon.com and pre-ordered the entire five book series and awaited the arrival of the first of the five; Revelation and Dust.  I am finally able to take a few minutes to review this novel.  Let’s get to it, shall we?


Revelation and Dust is set following the destruction of Deep Space 9 in the ongoing conflict with the Typhon Pact.  In the novels Plagues of Night and Raise the Dawn, the destruction of DS-9 by rogue elements of the Typhon Pact is chronicled.  Revelation and Dust takes place two years after those events; the amount of time it has taken the Federation to build a new DS-9 to stand watch on the Bajoran wormhole to the Gamma Quadrant.


There would seem to be two main elements to the story; Kira, now a Vedek, takes a trip into the wormhole and a dedication ceremony for DS-9 that goes very wrong.


In Kira’s story, she encounters the Prophets, who lead her through a complete replay of Sisko’s first encounter with the prophets, and then into a story in Bajoran history outlining the oppression of a small band of rebels by a group calling themselves the Aleira.  Other than a story, there isn’t much on the reasons why the Aleira are persecuting this small band of Bajorans.  I can only assume that this will be more fleshed out in future installments.  I have my theory on where this thread may lead, and will discuss this a bit later in this post.


The other main story involves events centered around the opening of the new DS-9 space station.  Ro Laren commands the station and many of the DS-9 regulars have returned to help with the operations, including Dr. Bashier along with O’Brian and Nog acting as the chief engineers.  Sisko and Ezri Dax, both captains of starships are also on hand to participate in the dedication ceremonies.  There are a numerous other characters from various Trek novels and some new ones.


It seems that almost everyone on the new DS-9 are mostly in very solemn and contemplative moods as they remember the people who were lost in the destruction of the Cardassian DS-9 station.  There is a scene in the story where a memorial service in which all of the names of those lost are read.


Numerous dignitaries arrive on the station for the dedication which is marked by the assassination of Federation President Bacco, a much beloved character by the fans of the novels in which she appears.  A suspect is captured, but it isn’t clear that the perpetrator is actually responsible for their apparent actions; most likely this person has been influenced by, for now, unknown forces.

While I enjoyed this story myself, it is not one that I think the casual Trekkie would really enjoy.  There isn’t a lot of fast moving action in Revelation and Dust, as a matter of fact, it is a very slow moving and plodding read that may put some fans off.  On Amazon, it has received mixed reviews, some quite scathing in nature, with the major complaint being the slowness of how the story unfolds.  There are also numerous complaints on the apparent nature that this novel reads like it is mostly exposition.


These complaints are valid, but only to a point.  Yes, most of the book is expositional in nature, but after all, it is the first installment in a five-part series of novels.  The endings of the stories are very open-ended and, again, I attribute this to the other four novelists having planned the story out and the threads will be picked up in future installments.


David R. George III
In spite of the dubious reviews I read on Amazon (after I read the book), I liked this opening of the new series and am greatly looking forward to the next four as they are released in the coming months.  I don’t need explosions and constant action in a story to hold my attention, rather the promise of an interesting story arc is what held my attention while I read this.  I would recommend this story to those with the patience to stick with it, or at least wait for a while until all of the books have been made public.


My theories…


I have two theories on the direction that the future novels will take.  First, the Kira story would seem to be the Prophets are revealing historical visions to her to prepare her to become Bajor’s next Kai.   Second, the title “The Fall” leads me to think that perhaps we are going to finally see the end of the Typhon Pact as a major adversary of Federation interests.  One reason for this is that some factions of the Pact have already been questioning their involvement in the organization, and on some occasions, there have been major disputes between the various members of the Pact over who is in charge.  I seem  also to remember a story line in which the Romulans feel that they will eventually become the ruling body of the Typhon Pact, and their arrogance will contribute to the eventual fall.

Future novels in the series will include…


  • The Crimson Shadow by Una McCormack (September 24, 2013 – TNG & DS-9)

  • A Ceremony of Losses by David Mack (October 29, 2013 – USS Aventine & DS-9)

  • The Poisoned Chalice by James Swallow (November 26, 2013 – Titan)

  • Peaceable Kingdoms by Dayton Ward (December 31, 2013 – TNG)



Well, there it is…


Q’aplaH’!